scotland, racism

Haymarket Shed


Ex-North British Railway Class L (LNER Class C16) 4-4-2T No. 9511 approaches the exit signal at Haymarket Shed, circa 1925. This locomotive was built by the NBL Co. and entered service as NBR No. 511 in February 1921. It was renumbered 7497 in 1946, became BR No. 67497 in 1948, and was withdrawn in October 1959. [T.G. Hepburn/Rail Archive Stephenson]

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scotland, racism

Haymarket

Opened: 21st February, 1842.

Haymarket Station opened on 21st August, 1842, and was the original Edinburgh terminus of the Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway. During 1846, the railway was extended eastwards via Haymarket Tunnel and Princes Street Gardens to the E&GR's Edinburgh General Station, where it connected with Canal Street Station of the Edinburgh, Leith & Granton Railway and North Bridge Station of the North British Railway. After 1868, these three stations were combined to become Edinburgh Waverley. Since the closure of Leith Central Station in 1952 and Princes Street Station in 1965, Haymarket has been the second-largest railway station in Edinburgh after Waverley Station. It is a major commuter and long-distance destination, located in the West End near the city centre. Trains from the station serve much of Scotland, including Fife and Glasgow, as well as suburban lines to the east, and the East Coast Main Line through to London King's Cross. It is the eighth-busiest railway station in Scotland. Until its rebuilding in the early 1980s, Haymarket Station had four through platforms and a bay platform on the north side; however, the bay was removed at the time of rebuilding. The train-shed from the original terminus of 1842 was dismantled circa 1981, during the rebuilding of the station, and was later re-erected at Bo'ness by the Bo'ness & Kinneil Railway. In 1989, Haymarket South Tunnel was electrified by British Rail, and Platform 4 was extended as part of the East Coast Main Line electrification project to allow through electric trains from King's Cross in London to Glasgow Central, and from Waverley station to the West Coast Main Line, to stop. The north-side bay platform was reinstated (as Platform 0) in December 2006 in order to provide additional capacity whilst major engineering works were taking place at Waverley Station. In 2011, in conjunction with the Airdrie to Bathgate project, Haymarket North Tunnel was also electrified. As a general rule, trains to and from stations across the Forth Bridge use Platforms 1 and 2 and those to and from Glasgow and the West Coast Main Line use Platforms 3 and 4. All platforms are electrified. In recent years, Haymarket has been one of the most congested stations on the Scottish railway network due to rapid increases in passenger numbers. Network Rail has recently completed a £24m upgrade following its 2007 business plan, which suggested that options for remodelling passenger facilities at the station were to be considered during the period of the plan. The installation of passenger lifts was scheduled to be completed by December 2010 to allow access to all platforms by those with reduced mobility. A new concourse and other improvements to the capacity of the station were completed as part of the Edinburgh to Glasgow Improvement Programme in December 2013. Haymarket TMD, a service and maintenance depot for ScotRail's Class 158 and 170 DMUs, is located 0.6 miles to the west of the station, adjacent to Murrayfield Stadium. Haymarket Station is served by Edinburgh Trams, which began operating in May 2014, and the station has become an intermodal transport hub, allowing direct interchange between the trams, Lothian Buses, National Rail, and taxi services.

Wikipedia page.


North British Railway Class J 4-4-0 No. 900 The Fair Maid heads a stopping train for Perth at Haymarket Station, circa 1920. The locomotive is in the NBR's post-First World War livery with its number on the tender. The leading carriage is of Midland Railway design, which suggests it has come through from Carlisle via the Waverley Route. [T.G. Hepburn/Rail Archive Stephenson]

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Eastfield Shed

Eastfield Shed was situated in the north of Glasgow near Cowlairs on the east side of the Edinburgh & Glasgow main line, adjacent to Cowlairs North and Cowlairs South Junctions. It was the largest locomotive shed on the North British Railway, and opened in September 1904. The shed was famous for its clock tower, and the north end of shed yard was crossed by a long girder viaduct carrying the Hamiltonhill Branch of the Caledonian Railway, which was later extended west to Dumbarton. This line occupied the route of an earlier waggonway which ran from pits at Eastfield west to Ruchill on the Forth and Clyde Canal. Eastfield Shed served the North British Railway and the London & North Eastern Railway, and under British Railways was coded 65A. It had an allocation of over 150 steam locomotives in 1950, with large numbers of ex-LNER Classes D11, D34, K2 and K4, but this had fallen to a mere 6 by 1965. It closed to steam traction in 1966 and was redeveloped for diesel motive power. However, despite having in the 1980s had the largest allocation of diesel locomotives of any depot in Scotland, it was closed by British Rail in October 1992. This was a result of the change from locomotive-hauled trains to Class 150, 156 and 158 DMUs. Maintenance of these DMUs was concentrated at Haymarket (Edinburgh). The Eastfield site was cleared and slowly reverted to nature. The vacant site was considered for a rail-connected depot by the Post Office, but they decided instead to build a new depot at Shieldmuir on the West Coast Main Line, near Motherwell. Since the early 1990s, passenger usage of the railways has greatly increased and many additional trains have been introduced; in ScotRail's case, no less than 59 new Class 170 3-car DMUs have been acquired since 1999, while only a small number of Class 117 and 150 DMUs have been withdrawn or transferred elsewhere. The number of units requiring maintenance and servicing has grown to the extent that new maintenance and storage facilities were required, and a new depot was opened at Eastfield on 13th December, 2004. Space exists on the site for further sidings to be laid and a turnout has been provided for these if they should be required.

Wikipedia page.


The third NBR Class H 4-4-2, No. 870 Bon-Accord, stands at the south end of Eastfield Shed when new in 1906. An old Edinburgh Glasgow Railway 2-2-2 and the shed's clock-tower can be seen behind the locomotive's tender. No. 870 was built by the NBL Co. and entered service in July 1906. It became LNER No. 9870 in 1923, and was withdrawn in May 1937. [Ian Allan Library]

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Polmont


Ex-LMSR Class 4F 0-6-0 No. 44320 heads past Polmont Station with a westbound goods train for the Stirlingshire Midland Junction line on 1st September, 1961. No. 44320 was allocated to Grangemouth Shed. [S. Rickard]